Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Say No to Bullying of All Kinds

Steve Ditko, Spider-Man art



Steve Ditko, Spider-Man art



Bullying takes many forms


Say No to Bullying -- of EVERY kind -- the Silver Age Marvel and DC super-heroes certainly did -- and we kids loved them for it...

Be someone who stops bullying before it even starts. Here are some ways to help beat bullying.

Stand up for people who are bullied. Bullies often want an audience and approval. Let bullies know that you do not think being mean is cool.

Take an anti-bullying pledge. Post a pledge to stand up against bullying. Share it with your friends, and let people know what you believe. And share an anti-bullying image on Facebook too.

Take action. See if you can start an anti-bullying club or prevention program. Talk to others. Try to learn more about how and where bullying happens. Talk about what might help. See if you and some friends can go together to at meeting places.

Talk to people and let them know that you care about this topic. Ask public forum venues if you might host an assembly on bullying. Ask for an anonymous survey to learn how many are being bullied and where.

Speak (and write) up. Write on a blog, in a newspaper letter or article, or social media to tackle bullying.

Get creative. How about starting a meme-making or writing contest? Work to develop tools for having a group discussion on bullying.

Sunday, October 15, 2017

George Nakashima: Writing Chair

George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima



George Nakashima





The George Nakashima Woodworker Complex, located in New Hope, Pennsylvania, was the home of the internationally renowned furniture designer and architect George Nakashima. The 12-acre complex has 21 buildings, all designed by Nakashima. The assortment of buildings, scattered across a wooded forest and open lawns, served as Nakashima's home and workspace until his death in 1990. Nakashima is recognized as one of America's most eminent furniture designer-craftsman and his style of "Organic Naturalism" can be seen in the buildings, landscape, and furniture located in the George Nakashima Woodworker Complex.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Friday, October 13, 2017

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Frank Lloyd Wright: Surimono Collector

Surimono print



Surimono print



Surimono print



Surimono print



Surimono print


An outstanding catalogue of a significant collection ignored by earlier "specialists" who catalogued the Frank Lloyd Wright collection (and labeled the box of surimono simply as "small woodblock prints").

Ms. Mirviss applies her considerable knowledge of Japanese art and her expertise in the peculiarities of the (nearly illegible) script used for the poetry to bring this collection to life. Her unfailing artistic eye makes to this potentially confusing print genre accessible to the Western audience -- and even modern Japanese.

Stunning illustrations of previously unpublished or rarely seen works enhance the richness and pleasure of this catalogue and complement the descriptive text and translations.

Surimono were Japanese woodblock prints privately commissioned for special occasions, an important event, or for circulation among a small group of people. Several features that set surimono apart from commercially produced woodblock prints are their smaller size, complex compositions, the expensive pigments used in their printing (including hand-rubbed metallic or mother-of-pearl pigments), the use of luxurious paper, and the use of poetic inscriptions on almost all prints. 

Like commercial woodblock prints of the Edo period many surimono were designed by ukiyo-e artists such as Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849)

The surimono published for the first time in this important catalog lay hidden in the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives at Taliesin West, Scottsdale, Arizona until their rediscovery in the mid-1980s.



























Eliot O'Hara: Signed Penny Postcard, 1937

Eliot O'Hara



Eliot O'Hara