Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Gordon Pembridge: Hand-Turned and Hand-Carved Wooden Bowls

 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge



 Gordon Pembridge




Hand-turned and meticulously carved wooden bowls by Gordon Pembridge...

Born in beautiful Kenya and now based in picturesque New Zealand, artist Gordon Pembridge has been lucky enough to have a lifelong relationship with nature. As a painter and woodworker, Pembridge often looks to his surroundings for inspiration, which has culminated in an oeuvre that incorporates elements of natural history and portrayals of local wildlife. A prime example of such work is Pembridge’s striking series of hand-painted, carved wooden vessels.

Each work of art is created through a woodturning process -- a sculpting technique that employs a lathe to shape the timber. Once Pembridge has achieved his desired shape, he meticulously hand-carves the wood into ornate, fern-like patterns, which he then paints and decorates with foliage, animals, and other natural motifs inspired by his two homes -- Kenya and New Zealand. Brightly colored and featuring elegantly intricate incisions, it is hard to believe the sculptures are crafted entirely out of wood.

In addition to woodturning and painting, Pembridge also dabbles in a myriad of other forms of art, including photography, graphic design, illustration, and engraving. Though his mediums may vary, his love of natural history remains a consistent muse throughout his work.






Friday, March 17, 2017

Soil Microbes and Serotonin Production






Did you know that there’s a natural antidepressant in soil? Mycobacterium vaccae is the substance under study and has indeed been found to mirror the effect on neurons that drugs like Prozac provide. 

The bacterium is found in soil and may stimulate serotonin production, which makes you relaxed and happier. Studies were conducted on cancer patients and they reported a better quality of life and less stress. Lack of serotonin has been linked to depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder and bipolar problems. The bacterium appears to be a natural antidepressant in soil and has no adverse health effects. These antidepressant microbes in soil may be as easy to use as just playing in the dirt. 

Antidepressant microbes in soil cause cytokine levels to rise, which results in the production of higher levels of serotonin. The bacterium was tested both by injection and ingestion on rats and the results were increased cognitive ability, lower stress and better concentration to tasks than a control group. 

Gardeners inhale the bacteria, have topical contact with it and get it into their bloodstreams when there is a cut or other pathway for infection. The natural effects of the soil bacteria antidepressant can be felt for up to three weeks if experiments with rats are any indication. So get out and play in the dirt and improve your mood and your life.

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Franz Kline: The Vital Gesture

Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline



Franz Kline began his career as a figurative painter, but in the late 1940s, he used a projector to enlarge one of his drawings of furniture onto the wall. Kline was intrigued by the resulting abstraction: “A four by five-inch black drawing of a rocking chair -- loomed in gigantic black strokes which eradicated any image, the strokes expanding as entities in themselves, unrelated to any entity but that of their own existence.” 

From this moment on, Kline would dedicate himself to creating large-scale, black-on-white abstract works. “I paint the white as well as the black,” he once said, “and the white is just as important.
The dynamic curves and slashes of his works may seem totally spontaneous, but many of his so-called action paintings, were carefully reproduced from preliminary studies. Many of Kline’s works, though non-representational, seem to suggest through their titles and through the stark, pulsing compositions the bridges, railroad tracks, and machinery of America. Kline’s material of choice -- inexpensive, low-viscosity house paints -- also points to the artist’s interest in industry and consumerism.






Saturday, March 11, 2017

Pablo Picasso: Lighthearted Ceramics

Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso


Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso



Pablo Picasso